What cities think about COST Actions

Cities are increasingly involved in COST Actions, yet the collaboration between cities and COST networks usually stays under the radar, with good practices not usually extending beyond the borders of COST Actions. On the 10th October, COST organised an event as part of the European Week of Regions and Cities to explore this issue further.

Karina Marcus and Mickael Pero, Science Officers at COST, held the session at Welsh House, Brussels, with the objective to look into the main benefits of cities and regions participating in COST Actions, from their perspective. This event took an innovative approach by inviting one city representative and one academic from three COST Actions on smart cities (CyberParksSmart Energy RegionsSub-Urban).

Three testimonials highlighted key benefits from a city point of view:

  • Building bridges: connect with the relevant research community can support in finding solutions – as well as connect with other cities facing similar challenges
  • Priority setting: connect research communities with local priorities helps to find common areas of interest  
  • Critical mass: involve research communities in key city challenges allows to increase the visibility and importance of the topic
  • Interdisciplinary: discuss with COST networks is an opportunity to relate with multiple research communities and point of views
  • Exploration: COST networks represent an access to different ideas offered by science and technology to solve daily problems for citizens
  • Acceleration: involving research communities can speed up the advancement of city projects

The event is considered a first step in deepening knowledge about collaborations between COST Actions and Cities.

For more information and to download the presentations visit: http://www.cost.eu/media/newsroom/cities-think-cost-actions

 

"Nobody Knows What Lies Beneath New York City" 

Read the story by greg milner from Bloomberg businessweek.

"Subterranean cartographers are bringing to light the dark, tangled truths buried under the streets." The attention of the what the subsurface  contains is increasing. Read the story here https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2017-08-10/nobody-knows-what-lies-beneath-new-york-city.

 

 

SUb-urban 2017 planning and management week 13.-16. of march in bucharest, romania. The final conference for cost action 1206 sub-urban 

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First Sub-Urban Training Workshop is being arranged in Lisbon, Portugal, 3. & 4. of November 2016

For more information go to: http://costsuburbantu1206.ipleiria.pt/

Rotterdam Resilience Strategy launched in MAY 2016

Chief Resilience Officer of Rotterdam Arnoud Molenaar together with Chair of COST action 1206 Sub-Urban Diarmad Campbell (BGS) and representatives from the Resilience City Lisbon  Paulo P. Pais and Resilient City Glasgow Cathy Johnston, together with Ignace van Campenhout from Rotterdam Municipality and Sub-Urban member and colleague. 

Chief Resilience Officer of Rotterdam Arnoud Molenaar together with Chair of COST action 1206 Sub-Urban Diarmad Campbell (BGS) and representatives from the Resilience City Lisbon  Paulo P. Pais and Resilient City Glasgow Cathy Johnston, together with Ignace van Campenhout from Rotterdam Municipality and Sub-Urban member and colleague. 

Rotterdam (NL), Lisbon (PT) and Glasgow (UK) are all part of the 100 Resilient Cities, pioneered by the Rockefeller Foundation. To learn more about the 100 Resilient Cites see http://www.100resilientcities.org  or https://www.rockefellerfoundation.org/our-work/initiatives/100-resilient-cities/

On May 19, 2016, the city of Rotterdam, the Netherlands, released its Resilience Strategy, outlining its plan to use initiatives including a circular economy, a climate change panel, and resilience education to address the city's challenges. To read Rotterdam`s Resilience Strategy go to: http://www.100resilientcities.org/blog/entry/rotterdams-resilience-strategy#/

 

Geologists turn detective to unearth map of underground Scotland


Read more: http://www.scotsman.com/news/geologists-turn-detective-to-unearth-map-of-underground-scotland-1-4069485#ixzz42yMDPFTy
Monday 14 March 2016 in the Scotsman, Scotland`s national newspaper

Geologists have embarked on a major piece of “detective work” to create a map of how Scotland looks beneath the surface.

The legacy of Scotland’s mining industry as well as the impact of more recent invasions on the country’s natural geology will all be documented. 

Dr Diarmad Campbell, chief geologist for Scotland at the British Geological Survey (BGS), said the aim was to make the surface of Scotland “transparent”. 

He said: “What we are trying to do is make the surface that we stand on transparent so that people can see through it, see the different rock formations and see what has been done with them in the past by previous generations.

“It is like a gigantic detective story. It is using all the forms of detective work we possibly can to build up the best picture possible of what has happened below the surface.”

The BGS is now focussing on the east of the central belt on land to the north and south of the Forth after completing a major analysis of “sub-surface” Glasgow.

It is using thousands of records, some dating back to the 19th century, to build up as accurate a picture as possible as to what lies below, with builders and renewable energy firms among those most likely to benefit.